Upcoming Events

FALL 2018

27-29 August 2018 (Turku, Finland)

WELL-BEING IN THE INFORMATION SOCIETY – FIGHTING INEQUALITIES

WIS 2018, which looks for innovations and fresh ideas in the cross-section of urban living, information society and health as understood in a wide sense. Starting in 2006, this is now the seventh conference in its series. The overarching theme of the  WIS 2018 conference is “Fighting inequalities”. More about program, registration and venues see here.
 30 October 2018 (University of Turku, Kaivokatu 12, Minerva, Janus)

THE COST OF BEARING WITNESS: Secondary Trauma & Self-Care in Field-Based Social Research

Co-Organized by Turku Institute of Advanced Studies 
The workshop addresses the emotional and psychological impact that conducting field research in contexts that go “under the skin” of a researcher, because they come so very close to one’s own difficult experiences, or they involve severely traumatized participants. Recording and analyzing such evidence may be traumatizing and have adverse effects upon the mental health of researchers in social research. As opposed to clinicians (psychotherapists, social workers) and personnel professionally trained in coping with trauma, field researchers in social/anthropological research are rather poorly equipped to cope with the overwhelming traumatic narratives from their research group.
This workshop brings together various experts, scholars and practitioners with the background in social and anthropological research to share first-hand experiences from the field and to brainstorm and collect ideas, and suggestions to develop techniques to assist in preventing or minimizing the trauma transfer.
PROGRAM
9.00-9.15 (Janus) Opening & Welcome
9.15-10.00 (Janus) Leaving the pain behind: Field work research in sensitive settings /key address by prof. Helena Ranta/
10.15.-11.15 (E123 & E323) Navigating professional & personal: Secondary trauma & preventive measures /workshop/
11.15-11.45 Coffee break
11.45-12.45 (Janus) Surviving field research: Dangers, risks, challenges /round table with Satu Lidman, Elise Feron & Panu Pihkala; moderated by Nena Močnik/
13.00-14.00 (E121 & E323) Self-care & coping with secondary trauma /workshop/
14.00-15.00 Concluding remarks & reception (hall in front of Janus)
Workshop is free, but places are limited (up to 50 participants). Information about the Call for Papers and Registration will be available soon. Light refreshments will be served. All Participants are welcomed to join the reception after the event.
19 November 2018, University of Turku, Finland

IMAGINING CITY FUTURES ACROSS DISCIPLINES

Symposium in cooperation with the Association for Literary Urban Studies and TIAS.
Knowing the future has increasingly become one of the moral imperatives of our age. Citizens and policy makers are expected to make choices on the basis of what the future holds in store, and yet, by definition, the future remains forever out of reach. What can be examined, however, are the signs of tomorrow in the form of textual and visual narratives of the future, and the way these envision and shape our pathways to various tomorrows.
This one-day symposium, organized by the Turku Institute for Advanced Studies, brings together researchers of future narratives from across disciplines. Its focus is on representations of the future across a range of genres, from literary fiction to futures scenarios, policy, and urban planning. It aims to examine the language, narrative frames, and metaphors with which futures are told, and the implications of such discursive strategies. How is the unknown future translated into known and narrated stories in the here-and-now? What are the implications of different frames of telling the future for the way in which we envision our possibilities to act on the future?
The symposium will contain three thematic threads:
–        Cities at the water
Envisioning new relationships between cities and the water; rising sea level and city futures; development of post-industrial port cities
–        Climate change
Narrative strategies, metaphors, and genres to describe future cities; framing in language of the challenges posed by, and possible responses (mitigation, adaptation) to climate change
–        Agency
Narrated agency and future cities; right and access to the city and to shaping future cities; human and non-human agency.
More information follows soon.

 

 

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